The Incomparable New Covenant

The “word” that God now speaks “in the Son” surpasses all the past revelations made in “the prophets.” Jesus went beyond them, “having achieved the purification of sins.” Consequently, he “sat down” at the right hand of God and inherited “all things.”

And among other things, his exaltation signaled the commencement of the promised “new covenant.”

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The Tent God Pitched

In the gospel of John, Jesus is the true Tabernacle where God dwells. Unlike the ancient structure with its inner sanctuary that only the high priest could enter, now, in Christ, His glory is visible for all men to see. No longer is His presence limited by physical walls and geographic boundaries.

In Jesus of Nazareth, the Father and the Creator of all things is worshipped anywhere and anytime “in spirit and truth.”

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A Change of Law

The letter to the Hebrews is structured around comparisons that demonstrate the superiority of the “word spoken in the Son” over past revelations “spoken in the prophets,” including Moses. Jesus surpasses even the Great Lawgiver.

The previous words provided by the Hebrew prophets were true but partial and preparatory. But now, “upon the last of these days,” God has “spoken” with great finality in one who is a “Son.”

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Priest Forever

The letter to the Hebrews begins by stressing the superiority of the “word spoken in the Son” over all previous revelations that were “spoken in the prophets.” And this includes the Great Lawgiver himself, Moses, and it indicates the fundamental weaknesses of the Levitical priesthood and its sacrificial system.

The previous words provided by the Hebrew prophets were true but partial and preparatory. But now, “upon the last of these days,” God has “spoken” with great finality in one who is a “Son.”

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THE SPIRIT OF LIFE

It is the Spirit of God that imparts life, especially the everlasting life in Jesus of which the gift of the Spirit is the foretaste and guarantee.

In the churches of Galatia, “false brethren” were preaching “another gospel,” one that pressured Gentile believers into getting circumcised, and otherwise, conforming to the regulations of the Mosaic legislation. But the Apostle Paul would have none of it. He responded with a series of arguments, most importantly, by appealing to the receipt of the gift of the Spirit by the Galatians.

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